The Department of State advises all U.S. citizens to read the country-specific Travel Advisories and U.S. Embassy COVID pages for updates on the impact of COVID-19 worldwide.  

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect countries differently. Challenges to any international travel at this time may include mandatory quarantines, travel restrictions, and closed borders. Foreign governments may implement restrictions with little notice, even in destinations that were previously low risk. If you choose to travel internationally, your trip may be severely disrupted, and it may be difficult to arrange travel back to the United States.

On March 14, the Department of State authorized the departure of U.S. personnel and family members from any diplomatic or consular post in the world who have determined they are at higher risk of a poor outcome if exposed to COVID-19. These departures may limit the ability of U.S. embassies and consulates to provide services to U.S. citizens.

For the latest information regarding COVID-19, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website.

Travelers are urged to enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. The Department uses these Alerts to convey information about terrorist threats, security incidents, planned demonstrations, natural disasters, etc.  

For emergency assistance, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate or call the following numbers: 1 (888) 407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1 (202) 501-4444 from other countries or jurisdictions.

If you decide to travel abroad or are already outside the United States:

Click  here  for our COVID FAQs Search Tool.

Information for Travelers Going to Europe:

If you are planning to visit or travel through Europe, we urge you to check the websites of the relevant U.S. embassies or consulates for information on restrictions, foreign quarantine policies, and urgent health information provided by relevant authorities.  

Some European countries currently prohibit entry by tourists and other non-essential travelers. We recommend that you visit the websites of those countries’ embassies in the United States for additional information including entry/exit restrictions and permissible categories of travel. 

Information for Travelers Returning to the United States:

U.S. Citizens Returning from Brazil

U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents are allowed to return from Brazil. See our FAQs on the Presidential Proclamations on travel and the  DHS website for further details.

U.S. Citizens Returning from Europe

U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents returning to the United States from the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the European Schengen area should review our FAQs on the Presidential Proclamation on travel from Europe and the Department of Homeland Security website for further details.

U.S. Citizens Returning from China

Any U.S. citizen returning to the United States who has been in China in the previous 14 days may be subject to up to 14 days of quarantine.

Please read these Department of Homeland Security supplemental instructions for further details.

Cruise Ship Passengers

The CDC has extended its No Sail Order for all cruise ships through September.

U.S. citizens, particularly travelers with underlying health conditions, should not travel by cruise ship at this time. The CDC notes there is increased risk of infection of COVID-19 on cruise ships. In order to curb the spread of COVID-19, many countries have implemented strict screening procedures that deny port entry rights to ships and prevent passengers from disembarking. 

CDC notes that older adults and travelers with underlying health issues should avoid situations that put them at increased risk for more severe disease. This entails avoiding crowded places, non-essential travel, and especially avoiding cruise ships. Passengers with plans to travel by cruise ship should contact their cruise line companies directly for further information, continue to monitor the travel.state.gov website, and read the latest information from the CDC.

U.S. Students Abroad

The CDC recommends  institutes of higher education (IHE) consider postponing or canceling upcoming student foreign exchange programs. In addition, the CDC recommends IHE consider asking current program participants to return to their home country. 

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