The coronavirus pandemic has sickened more than 40,865,400 people, according to official counts. As of Wednesday morning, at least 1,125,700 people have died, and the virus has been detected in nearly every country, as these maps show.



Average daily cases per 100,000 people in past week

Share of population with a reported case

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Sources: Local governments; The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; World Health Organization.

About this data

The hot spots map shows the share of population with a new reported case over the last week. Data for the West Bank and Gaza was reported together by the Palestinian Health Ministry and includes only Palestinian-controlled land. Russia is reporting data for Crimea, a peninsula it annexed in 2014 in a move that led to international sanctions. Data for some countries, like the United States and France, include counts for overseas territories. Japan’s count includes 696 cases and seven deaths from a cruise ship that docked in Yokohama.

The coronavirus pandemic is ebbing in some of the countries that were hit hard early on, but the number of new cases is growing faster than ever worldwide, with more than 200,000 reported each day on average.

Total
cases

Per 100,000

Total
deaths

Per 100,000

Cases
in last
7 days

Per 100,000

Deaths
in last
7 days

Per 100,000

Weekly cases per capita




Fewer

More

Andorra

3,623

4,705

62

81

628

816

5

6.5

Andorra heatmap

Czech Republic

193,946

1,825

1,619

15

64,199

604

513

4.8

Czech Republic heatmap

Belgium

240,159

2,103

10,489

92

66,919

586

245

2.1

Belgium heatmap

Luxembourg

11,241

1,850

136

22

2,122

349

8

1.3

Luxembourg heatmap

Netherlands

259,154

1,504

6,933

40

55,820

324

185

1.1

Netherlands heatmap

Gibraltar

621

1,842



109

323



Gibraltar heatmap

Armenia

68,530

2,322

1,121

38

9,128

309

69

2.3

Armenia heatmap

Montenegro

15,892

2,554

247

40

1,624

261

34

5.5

Montenegro heatmap

France

MAP »

930,745

1,389

33,885

51

174,273

260

943

1.4

France heatmap

Slovenia

15,982

773

200

10

5,242

254

19

0.9

Slovenia heatmap

Weekly cases per capita shows the share of population with a new reported case for each week. Weeks without a reported case are shaded gray.

The virus continues to affect every region of the world, but some countries are experiencing high rates of infection, while others appear to have mostly controlled the virus.

Where new cases are higher and staying high

Countries where new cases are higher had a daily average of at least four new cases per 100,000 people over the past week. The charts, which are all on the same scale, show daily cases per capita and are of countries with at least five million people.

Where new cases are higher but going down

Where new cases are lower but going up

Countries where new cases are lower had a daily average of less than four new cases per 100,000 people over the past week. The charts, which are all on the same scale, show daily cases per capita and are of countries with at least five million people.

Where new cases are lower and staying low

Where new deaths are increasing

The charts, which are all on the same scale, show daily deaths per capita and are of countries with at least five million people.

These countries have had the highest growth in newly reported deaths over the last 14 days. Deaths tend to rise a few weeks after a rise in infections, as there is typically a delay between when people are infected, when they die and when deaths are reported. Some deaths reported in the last two weeks may have occurred much earlier because of these delays.

The outbreak was initially defined by a series of shifting epicenters — including Wuhan, China; Iran; northern Italy; Spain; and New York.

Cases worldwide leveled off in April after social distancing measures were put in place in many of the areas with early outbreaks.

But as countries began to reopen in May and June, the United States was unable to contain a resurgence of the disease, making it one of the main drivers of rising case numbers around the world. Many South American countries are also experiencing high rates of infection, and European countries that had severe early outbreaks are seeing a second rise in cases.

New reported cases by day across the world

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

New cases

7-day average

Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

Reported deaths by day across the world

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

New deaths

7-day average

Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Follow our coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.

United States

The number of known coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow. As of Wednesday morning, at least 8,316,000 people across every state, plus Washington, D.C., and four U.S. territories, have tested positive for the virus, according to a New York Times database, and at least 220,900 patients with the virus have died.

Reported cases in the United States

Average daily cases per 100,000 people in the past week

Coronavirus hotspots

Ala.AlaskaAriz.Ark.Calif.Colo.Conn.Del.Fla.Ga.HawaiiIdahoIll.Ind.IowaKan.Ky.La.MaineMd.Mass.Mich.Minn.Miss.Mo.Mont.Neb.Nev.N.H.N.J.N.M.N.Y.N.C.N.D.OhioOkla.Ore.Pa.R.I.S.C.S.D.Tenn.TexasUtahVt.Va.Wash.W.Va.Wis.Wyo.P.R.

Sources: Local governments; The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University; National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China; World Health Organization.

About this data

Note: The map shows the share of population with a new reported case over the last week. Parts of a county with a population density lower than 10 people per square mile are not shaded. Sources: State and local health agencies and hospitals.

See our page of maps, charts and tables tracking every coronavirus case in the U.S.

After case numbers fell steadily in April and May, cases in the United States are growing again at about the same rapid pace as when infections were exploding in New York City in late March. But the hotspots are now mainly spread across the southern and western parts of the country.

The New York Times is engaged in an effort to track the details of every reported case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. The numbers in this article are being updated several times a day based on the latest information our journalists are gathering from around the country. The Times has made that data public in hopes of helping researchers and policymakers as they seek to slow the pandemic and prevent future ones.

Read more about the methodology and download county-level data for coronavirus cases in the United States from The New York Times on GitHub.

About the data

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.

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